What we see is influencing us, looking at pictures leads us to differnt thoughts or remind us to what we’ve truly feel in this moments. Captured in a photograph, the motives becomes proof for our existence. I select one of thsoe images from unsplash.com, which has inspired me on a philosophical, social or artistic matter. This one in particular, represents a certain Zeitgeist. Image by Craig Whitehead

I have to admit, there‘s a certain fashion angle to this picture, but the reason I chose this, is a more general one. Many people all over the globe are on their way out. Out to leave their countries and life‘s for political or financial reasons. One side of it plays its‘ part in globalization and education—as we editors do—others have to flee in fear of death. Similar to a large group of Europeans—including countless Germans—between 1939 and 1945, I find that movement destructive. These other human beings, leave everything behind and suffer—to save their families or themselves—not to make war, but to live a life without fear. Which is hard to imagine for a society, which have had the same issues not even 80 years ago. While history has proofed, that many humans‘ lives, cycle around pure ego and their primal instinct to survive, this society has become a mirror of narcissistic leaders. The pressure to be part of their crown is oppressive to my generation…I refuse.

Craig Whitehead captures a very instinctive feeling of unexpected movement in me, the sudden aim to run away, save myself. Born in 1992, I discovered early the deep rooted path of a society in war, through my own family members. They’ve painted that nightmare for me: A society, which has never learned to open themselves to others. A constant fight between two sides, cold frontiers, war or forced peace and isolation—the fundamental fear of losing control, paired with cultural paranoia and judgement. Who we are to judge?

While I personally ran away to tear down walls, unpleasantly numerous others still build them up, as they did after the war. Life is private and quiet, without the others. As long as they don’t ask us for something, we don’t have to face them. There is no war. I’m not a racist, but… The line is thin for those who are actually open for the art of cultural intercourse. Again, who we are to judge?

Especially if we don’t remember what happened to us? Or what we’ve done a few decades ago? It’s still history, which repeats itself, until we change our paths. Fact is, the country I grew up in is still racists, after all this years of separation and political judgment. I would rather run away from Germany, than live amongst this deep brown thoughts of others any longer. But I can’t think of a place which might be safe from a nuclear attack or these tweets of a scarry clown. Run away, as fast as I can. Somehow even more than I wanted to, when I was younger and still living in a village.

#REFUGEESWELCOME

I feel sorry for those, living in fear. But even more empathizing with those, who had to run again, after arriving in Germany. I feel ashamed for a country, that we have to be in a subconscious war with others, for political, religious or financial reasons, even in Berlin. Still in war, after countless years of negotiation, financial and political benefits and last but not least pleasant educational intercourse with the others.

It’s again, just us humans. △


IMAGES | CRAIG WHITEHEAD, the Tate Modern, London | via unsplash.com
More work of the Artist, here

Alexandre Renaldy
Posted by:Alexandre Renaldy

Editor in Chief, Work: The Corner Berlin, flair magazine, H.O.M.E.; Signature Places, Vestiaire Collective, EVE images, B'SPOQUE magazine etc.